King Tut meets 2020 (and what I’ve learned)

I really wanted to write something wise and insightful about 2020. I would like to be that guy, you know the guy who people read and think, “Gee, I wish I was as wise and insightful.”

If you’ve made it past the first paragraph and still looking for something wise and insightful, you might want to jump back to the last site you were on and click on the link that says, “You won’t believe number 12” or “Gut Doctor says to throw out this vegetable immediately.” I got nothing, well pretty much nothing except for this flashback …


It was 1977, Tutmania was in full swing at the Field Museum in Chicago, as “The Treasures of King Tutankhamun” (the boy king of Egypt 3000 years earlier) came through town, breaking attendance records and adding millions of dollars to the city’s tourist trade and Mrs. Poppy and I were there to contribute our few dollars. We were newly married, we were naive, did not have much money, but we were on a mission to see the King Tut exhibit. Mind you, this was pre-internet, pre-GPS, we headed to Chicago without much of a plan, but armed with a AAA roadmap, some cash in my wallet, and cruising up I-55 in a lime-green AMC Gremlin …what could go wrong?


Not having reservations was a big mistake and not arriving until after dark didn’t help. After multiple failed attempts and many “No Vacancy” signs later we ended up at a luxury high-rise hotel on Lakeshore Drive.

We got a room.

It was a fabulous room with an incredible view of downtown Chicago. It also used up half of our budget for the entire trip. We retreated the next morning to a seedy little motel in a less than desirable part of town, but we persevered, toured other museums, and prepared for our date with King Tut.

We got up early and headed to the Field Museum, waited in our first line to get a number and approximate time for the second line (four or five hours later). Don’t remember what we did during those waiting hours, but I’m pretty sure my bladder was a lot stronger back then. Our time finally came and we were ushered in. It was worth the wait. The artistry, the engineering, the craftsmanship, the beauty of each ancient artifact was incredible. And I had a minor epiphany.

Those ancient Egyptians were just as intelligent as we were in 1977 (or now), maybe even more intelligent in some cases. We are all on version “Humanity 1.0,” sure our technology has changed, modern humanity does most things a lot faster, but not necessarily better. Humanity as an aggregate does not change that much over the millenniums. We have our up years and our down years. 2020 seems like a big deal to us now, because we are living it, it’s on our doorstep. I believe history will weigh 2020 as a middling year, certainly not our best and certainly not our worst.

I do believe though that 2020 gave us a little dose of steroids that amplified our personalities and natures. The politicians who were power-hungry and over-reaching in 2019 became just a little more power-hungry and over-reaching in 2020. The first responders who put their lives on the line last year, did so again this year, but with the added threat of an unseen enemy. Those humans who were prone to be selfish and self-centered the year before now had a horde of toilet paper in their basement. Fortunately, I believe those who were selfless and self-sacrificing also got a little boost this year.

Where does this leave us in 2021?

The transition from 2020 to 2021 is just another rotation of our planet, not much will change. A different year, a different U.S. president will not change us. And if you are looking to politicians, celebrities, and social media influencers for guidance, you are looking in all the wrong places, because they will always be working under the same operating system of “Humanity 1.0.”

If you are looking for guidance, if you are looking for hope, look to the One who wrote the software. Over the millenniums, despite our best attempts at self-destruction, we continue to bumble along, covered by Grace … and that won’t change in 2021.

Peace Poppy

6 thoughts on “King Tut meets 2020 (and what I’ve learned)

  1. Well put, as always, Poppy. I do think you got a bit of wisdom in there! And I remember a exhibit coming through Cleveland–not sure if it was King Tut or one of his cousins–that was just amazing. Things like that were more surprising then, without all the internet previews and trailers beforehand. Happy 2021!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I really enjoyed this story. You could have said, “There is nothing new under the sun” and many other verses from Ecclesiastes. But you said it in your fine way just as eloquently.

    2020 was a year of revelations. Adversity has a way of exposing things. Namely: who we really are. It revealed our fears, our selfishness, and our pride. It revealed corruption on a grand scale. But our God is greater and as you said, His grace covers us.

    God bless and keep you. May His face shine upon you amd give you His peace.

    Like

  3. Always insightful writing.
    We certainly learned things about ourselves this year.
    I always have known I am a “people person” and this year has underscored that fact!
    I miss my family, my friends, my church almost to the point of despair. Being in lockdowns is not for me!
    But what are you going to do?
    Even though I live in an assisted living facility, I still spent most of my time alone in my apartment.
    One can only watch TV, be on Facebook, or color for so long before you start to get stir crazy. So then you take your pencils down to the concierge and have her sharpen them AGAIN!
    My day goes like this (other than meals, mostly served in my room in styrofoam!): Bible study, tv national news, read local paper, Game Show Network, napping, glass of wine, football on tv, snacking and devotion reading and bedtime. Sometimes sleep comes soon, otherwise it’s 2:00-3:00 a.m.
    O Lord, how long?
    Please join me in praying for the end of this pandemic 😷!
    Blessings to you and have a good night.

    Like

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